From world-renowned art markets to beautiful cathedrals, Santa Fe’s attractions deliver unique and unforgettable experiences. Plan your next visit to our historic bed and breakfast in Santa Fe and check out these top attractions in Santa Fe you won’t want to miss!

Santa Fe Plaza

Santa_Fe_Plaza-wikipediaThe historical Santa Fe Plaza is by far Santa Fe’s top attraction. Every potential guest who calls the Inn asks, “how far are you from the Plaza?” Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the Plaza is the heart of Santa Fe for residents & visitors alike. Since the city’s founding in 1610, the Santa Fe Plaza has been our cultural hub, hosting bullfights, dances, markets and festivals. Today the Plaza continues to be the epicenter of Santa Fe affairs, from live music nightly in summer to the City’s lighting of the Christmas tree in November. Any night of the week, the plaza is buzzing with activity as visitors and locals shop, celebrate, and dine. The plaza is surrounded by restaurants, galleries and souvenir shops. On the North side of the Plaza, browse the wares of Native American artisans selling jewelry & crafts. They love to chat with visitors. If you like something, snatch it up as it might not be there on your next visit. Artisans participating in the Native American Vendors Program participate in a lottery system that determines when they can exhibit their items. Items offered for sale include pottery, metalwork, jewelry, beadwork, sand paintings, leatherwork, weaving, carving (both stone and wood), drums, drawings and paintings. Some vendors sell foodstuffs such as oven bread, pies and tamales.

Canyon Road

Colorful-FlutesSince its early Native American and Spanish roots, Canyon Road has been a destination in New Mexico – initially a farming community, later as an art colony, and today as one of the country’s top art markets. Stretching east from near the Santa Fe Plaza, Canyon Road is home to art galleries selling renowned museum-quality artwork from famed global artists and cultural Native American and Southwestern treasures. Santa Fe still attracts painters and sculptors who work in studios along Canyon Road and invite the public to watch them at work. Not an art lover? Canyon Road is still worth a visit as many of the galleries are housed in historic adobe buildings dotted with bright flowers, chili pepper ristras, and architectural charm. Stop at the tea house for a break and a tasty snack. One of Santa Fe’s most beloved holiday traditions is the Christmas Eve Farolito Walk, which lights up the hearts and souls of thousands who promenade the famous path on Christmas Eve.

Santa Fe Farmers Market

Farmers-Market-VegetablesWhether you’re visiting Santa Fe to see the art, experience some fine dining, or ski the slopes, set aside some time to check out the Santa Fe Farmers Market. Open year round, with a few exceptions, you’ll find a variety of vendors selling locally grown produce, flowers, artisan baked-goods, cheeses, and tongue-tingling chili. Located in in the heart of the Santa Fe Railyard, the Farmers Market also features food concessions, as well as great shopping and live music. Restaurants, galleries, and ample shopping opportunities are nearby!

Cathedral Basilica of St. Francis of Assisi

Cathedral_Basilica_of_St._Francis_of_Assisi_wikipediaArchitectural buffs will enjoy Santa Fe’s Cathedral Basilica of St. Francis of Assisi. Located a block east of the Santa Fe Plaza, this beautiful Romanesque cathedral stands out among the city’s adobe skyline. The Cathedral regularly plays hosts to musical performances. In 1850, Santa Fe received its first Bishop, Father John Baptiste Lamy of France (whom Willa Cather based her novel Death Comes to the Archbishop…. the quintessential Santa Fe novel). Bishop Lamy ordered a new Romanesque church built, and brought French architects and Italian stonemasons to build his Cathedral. Construction of the Cathedral began in 1869 and continued until 1887. Sitting next to the cathedral is the small adobe chapel dedicated to Our Lady La Conquistadora. It is all that remains of a prior church that was destroyed during the 1680 Pueblo Indian revolt. The chapel contains the oldest representation of the Madonna in the United States. The Cathedral Basilica of St. Francis of Assisi is open daily to the public, but visitors should check their website for a detailed schedule of masses and other events.

New Mexico State Capitol (a.k.a. the Roundhouse)

New_Mexico_State_Capitol_wikipediaLocated at the corner of the Old Santa Fe Trail and the Paseo de Peralta, the New Mexico territorial styled Roundhouse is the seat of government for New Mexico. It is unique as the only round state capitol in the United States. The building was designed in the shape of the Zia Sun Symbol which also graces the New Mexico State Flag. It symbolizes the Circle of Life: four winds, four seasons, four directions, and four sacred obligations (strong body, clear mind, pure spirit, and devotion to the welfare of others). Please don’t just walk by in admiration. Residing inside the Roundhouse is a treasure not to be missed – The Capital Art Collection. The Collection features contemporary masterworks by artists who live and work in New Mexico and is housed throughout the public areas of the building on all four floors. The Collection consists of a wide range of media, styles and traditions, including handcrafted furniture. Visitors can take a self-guided tour anytime between 7 a.m. and 6 p.m. Monday through Friday. Be sure to check out the Governor’s Gallery!